What is Series Vs Parallel?

Perhaps you've wondered the same thing. Perhaps no one with a demeanor as calming as Dan's has explained it to you. Here it is, a clear definition of how In-Series and Parallel routing work. Take this knowledge with you and apply it your musical export. 

Atiya Jones of Twelve Twenty Studios and The Art of the Excess

 

For every Old Blood Noise Endeavors pedal release I contract a different artist to create the artwork—It's one of my most favorite parts of the job. For the Excess I was looking for something that visually summons tumult and unpredictable undulation, much like the excess does sonically. I was explaining my loose concept/ idea to a  close friend and she pointed me in the direction of Atiya's work. I immediately reached out to Atiya because her style and vibe were perfect for the project.  Below are some words from Atiya on her process and approach, be sure to check out her website atiyajones.com and follow her on social media @_twelvetwenty. We're honored to and grateful to Atiya for lending her skill and craft to the Old Blood line. -Seth McCarroll

 

All photos used with permission via Atiya Jones. Color photo of Atiya by Jenna Houston.

"My work conjures apophenia, which is the psychological concept of finding patterns where they do not exist. People have a propensity to fight for definition and sense where it does not exist. I find it to be both a really beautiful and detrimental trait in our strange species. 

I use my art and creative workshops, above all else, to connect with people. Making contributions towards building a sense of community is my purpose, and these Wildlines allow me to just that. As a non-musician, this project places my work within a community to which I am normally just a voyeur. I’m very proud of this project and grateful for the opportunity to share it with your team and clients."

Giveaway with Strymon

It's been a while since we've done a giveaway. This one is about sharing too, which is nice. Tag a friend for the chance for you to both win  a Strymon Sunset Overdrive, Ojai power supply, and Old Blood Noise Endeavors Excess Distortion Chorus/ Delay. Sharing is caring. Sharon is Karen. Have fun I hope you win. Full contest terms can be found below the giveaway image.

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Strymon Rulez

The Fault Overdrive / Distortion. Why is it?

So, the cat is out of the proverbial bag.  We released our first drive-ish pedal.  Announced it on Cinco de Mayo, 2017.  Started shipping back on Wednesday May 17th.  But the Fault origins started awhile back and sort of centers around my personal preference for overdriven and distorted guitar sounds.  See, I tend to prefer an amp that has some drive to it and is already dynamic before ever putting a pedal in front of it.  So that's where we went.

I've been somewhat surprised by the response to an Old Blood overdrive.  A couple of common questions have included "What made Old Blood want to make an overdrive?" often said with a scrunched face and upward inflection.  Well, honestly, over time we had a hodge podge overdrive circuit with EQ and Gain functionality that we personally enjoyed.  And the MO of Old Blood from day one has been to put out pedals that we enjoy and find musical, even though others may not. "Will it fit in with your lineup since it isn't that weird?"  It is true.  The Fault isn't that weird.  And I'm not sure how functional a "weird" overdrive would be.  Just don't have the vision for that I guess.  What it lacks in weirdness, I suppose, was made up for by the ability to cover a lot of sonic territory.  The Fault can be used in a wide range of setups, clean and dirty amps alike, with a lot of EQ tweakability to make unique and musical sounds.  

Also, I'd like to extend thanks to the musical and engineering brains who offered up some feedback on the Fault.  We sent out around 10 "Proto" units to be verbally and physically abused in order to refine the circuit as best we could.  And this Fault.  This pedal.  This is where we landed.  For us, it does the trick.  So we'll probably get back to the niche and the weird.

 Johnny Dang from o'Brother with Proto #2.

Johnny Dang from o'Brother with Proto #2.

 August Graybosch of Otis Amps with Proto #8.

August Graybosch of Otis Amps with Proto #8.

 Amp builder Çaleb Barton of Bridge City Sound with Proto #6.

Amp builder Çaleb Barton of Bridge City Sound with Proto #6.

 Cathy from Datachoir with Proto #10.

Cathy from Datachoir with Proto #10.

 Freaking Pete Jonas with Proto #9.

Freaking Pete Jonas with Proto #9.

 Phillippe from Caroline Guitar Co. with Proto #7 and a Sovtek to kill for.

Phillippe from Caroline Guitar Co. with Proto #7 and a Sovtek to kill for.

 Joe Cannetti threw Proto #5 into the studio with Crime in Stereo.

Joe Cannetti threw Proto #5 into the studio with Crime in Stereo.

 Proto #5 on the road with Movielife.

Proto #5 on the road with Movielife.

This Is Why I Like You - Brent and Black Fountain

Brent Hodge is a full time builder and visual generalist at Old Blood Noise Endeavors, as well as a very active percussionist. Here you The musical piece he constructed and  also video element to complement the piece. Make it loud. 

"To me, the black fountain is a portal to a vast and ethereal paradise.  
A place of warmth, light, bliss, and tranquility.

Instrument and recording setup: Casio CTK-471 and Rickenbacker guitar ran into the black fountain all directly recorded into an mbox-2 interface using protools 8."


March - The Month We Start Living Again

It is Sunday in mid March.  SXSW stuff is next week.  Some of the guys are going down to man a board at the Pedalboard Expo thing.  We went to some shows lately.  That was cool.  And we're quietly stirring the pot on something here and something there, eventually to see the light.  

We also did a limited run of inverted color schemes of the Utility Line.  OBNE Headphone Amp, OBNE 3 Band EQ / Buffer and AB/Y Switcher.  We made 20 of each.  Already going until they're gone.

 

This Is Why I Like You - Brady and the Dark Star

It might be important to note why this "Why I Like You" series needs to exist.  It probably seems like it doesn't need to—Why would we need to start a discussion about why we like our own pedals?  Well, after you've tested over 1,000 of the same pedal, using the same notes, turning the same knobs and only listening for correct functionality, it becomes easy to forget what that pedal can actually do or how it feels to create something with the sounds it can produce.  That's why.  Because we forget.  

So, this week, Seth tasked me with re-exploring the Dark Star.  This gloriously noisey yet soft spoken reverb, cable of fully washing out the instrument to create seamless notes.  We champion it as a "pad-like" reverb, meaning it is easy to create swells and transition from different notes with little to no attack.  Something that I've always wanted in guitar pedals, often resulting in stacking multiple reverbs and delays to fully wash away the attack of a note. In my mind, it is the sound of the opening track on Turn On The Bright Lights, Interpol's first record.  Soft melodies buried in a wash of reverb, stacked on one another.  So, that's how I use this pedal.  To create a wall of washed out sounds, mostly from one, unassuming pedal.  This is Why I Like You.

This Is Why I Like You - Pancakes and Mondegreen

Mondegreen. When we first met last summer, I thought I knew who you were.  You’re a delay pedal, right? So I say “bing,” and you say “bing” a little bit later?  But I said “bing,” and you responded softly: b’ing. You made me think about perception, about time, about the little differences. The octaves were pretty, yes. The chorus I understood. But the tremolo. To put a tremolo on a delay trail seems like such a simple idea, but to really hear it is a different thing entirely. Two different rhythms playing with each other and with the player. Trying to do something in time, but not being sure whether to listen to the attack or to the rise and fall. So I kicked on a fuzz and gave into the idea that we can listen without counting. It’s a pleasure, Mondegreen, to learn something new from you.

Dan is the purchasing manager and screenprinting technician at Old Blood Noise Endeavors. Below you'll find the video component he produced show his process in real time.

OBNEAC Hits

About a year ago when we started doing OBNEAC and decided to do the Tape Club series, I thought it would be fun to couple a video element with each release. As the releases trickle out every few months, so do their videos. Each band comes by OBNEAC HQ and we capture a live audio / visual performance of both the A and B sides of their tapes. I really enjoy it, it's really fun to hear the different personalities that each song possesses and how that manifests in a studio or live atmosphere and vice versa. So here they are, look forward to many more.